Jaciara

€89
Jaciara means Moonrise in Tupi, one of the most popular indigenous languages in Brazil. Tupi guaranis were one of the most numerous peoples indigenous in Brazil, before colonisation. They settled in the Amazon rainforest about 2,900 years ago.

For decades now, the jewelry industry has only offered women a limited selection of fixed-length Rings and Bracelets. So we decided to design a Collection with Rings and Braceletes that can be infinitely adjustable to the EXACT length desired.

If you are looking for a delicate and minimalistic eco-friendly, ethical statement bracelet. You are in the right here. Every time you buy from sustainable, independent brands you help make a positive change to the fashion industry.

Every bracelet is made by hand, making each one unique. Ethically handmade using capim dourado, a plant that just grows in Brazil and is knowing as the plant based gold.

DESCRIPTION:

- High quality handcrafted by Brazilian artisans

- Made of a plant

- Naturally shiny

- Fairtrade and eco friendly

- Cruelty free

- Made from natural, renewable resources

EUROPE FREE SHIPPING, WORLD WIDE ON ORDERS OVER 100€ (by DHL)

RETURN PACKAGES within 14 days after receipt. 

Where do WE ship from?
All orders are processed and shipped from our head office in Germany. Sheisfromthejungle or DHL can NOT guarantee delivery times, but we will do our best to get your package out to you as quickly as we can.

Shipping during COVID-19
Due to the import stop by DHL through COVID-19, we can currently not ensure shipping outside the EU.

 

Our products are produced in a fair trade base and 10% of the profit goes to the Street-child Project CAMM. This Project exists over 35 Years in a Slum called "Linda do Tiro" Northeast of Brazil. Some of the Mother and Young Women’s living here are also involved in the Brand.

EARTHWORKS estimates that 70% of global gold production goes into jewelry market. They calculate that to make a wedding ring, around 20 tons of toxic waste are produced. Golden Grass comes from Brazil, where it is an important source of income for villagers. The conservation management by the Brazilian government (EMBRAPA) assures that it is a renewable resource. 

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